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The late Walter Cronkite as a role model for IT managers? At first glance, we might not see the connection between "the most trusted man in America" and high tech management. But if we pull back the layers of how Cronkite approached his job, there are solid day-to-day career lessons for those working in IT. Seven Best Practices Straight From the Desk of Uncle Walter 1. Explain things in a simple way so everyone can understand. CBS' Bob Schieffer said people "understood Cronkite was guiding you through events." He translated the complex or hard to understand in a way that made you nod and think, "I get I now." When explaining the impact of an IT project for your organization, break it down so the non-techies get the light bulb over their heads. Explain it so your mother can understand it--use the criteria: how would Cronkite say this? 2. Have an unbridled enthusiasm. N... (more)

Sun Launches JavaFX Mobile

Sun Microsystems announced the availability of the JavaFX Mobile platform, enabling the Java wireless ecosystem to create expressive solutions, which leverage the power and ubiquity of the Java Platform Micro Edition (Java ME). The JavaFX Mobile platform delivers rich content and services across a range of mobile devices - from mass market feature phones to smart phones. Sun also announced that several leading handset manufacturers, service providers and ISVs are working with Sun to ship JavaFX Mobile handsets. The Java platform is supported by global mobile operators and device ... (more)

Java for Managers -- What Should They Know?

Last month, JavaBlackBelt completed a survey where developers said their teams would be 25% more productive if their management committed to skills management... which led me to consider: Which Java technologies do developers think that managers should understand better in order to make great decisions about skills management? I'll suggest, as a start: -- Java SE and EE basics -- ORM's (Hibernate, ...) -- Web Frameworks (lStruts 2, ...) -- IDEs (Eclipse, ...) -- Source Code Mgmt -- Testing Methods -- JavaScript -- Ajax Very open to your thoughts, and who might find such a course usef... (more)

How to Diagnose Java Resource Starvation

We can visualize resource starvation using an elaborate rendition of the Dining Philosophers Problem. This classic metaphor of resource allocation among processes was first introduced in 1971 by Edsger Dijkstra in his paper "Hierarchical Ordering of Sequential Processes." It's been a model and universal method for verifying theories on resource allocation ever since. The metaphor goes like this: There are three well-known philosophers in an Asian bistro. Dinner is served but they are only given three chopsticks because the restaurant's supply truck has been stuck in a snow storm f... (more)

eLearning + Coaching = Breakthrough in Java Skills?

JavaBlackBelt just announced its “Coached e‐Learning” for Java developers. In a developer survey to be released next week, this Coached e‐Learning was selected as the #1 choice for Java learning compared with classroom training and self‐paced e‐Learning. Here’s how it works: 1. In these courses, the coach meets with the student to begin each course, reviews the course plan and materials, and agrees to a schedule. 2. The student then learns at their own pace from the JavaBlackBelt eLearning platform ‐‐ online materials and videos, community forums, exercises, and exams. 3. Alon... (more)

Java Kicks Ruby on Rails in the Butt

This article tries to demonstrate that Java can be more productive than Ruby. We are going to develop the same application of the article Rolling with Ruby on Rails Revisited (part 1 [1] and part 2 [2]) but using POJO [3]s annotated with JPA [4] and a Model Driven Framework, OpenXava [5] in this case. The result is that with less code, and less time you obtain a more powerful application. Ruby and rails: The regressive framework Ruby on rails [6] is so elegant, so easy, so productive. I cannot avoid read and heard continuously these comments. For example, the article Rolling with ... (more)