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This article tries to demonstrate that Java can be more productive than Ruby. We are going to develop the same application of the article Rolling with Ruby on Rails Revisited (part 1 [1] and part 2 [2]) but using POJO [3]s annotated with JPA [4] and a Model Driven Framework, OpenXava [5] in this case. The result is that with less code, and less time you obtain a more powerful application. Ruby and rails: The regressive framework Ruby on rails [6] is so elegant, so easy, so productive. I cannot avoid read and heard continuously these comments. For example, the article Rolling with Ruby on Rails Revisited of Bill Walton says: “What would you think if I told you that you can develop a web application at least ten times faster with Rails than you can with a typical Java framework?” Oops! Ten times faster! Well, after these comments I decided to learn Ruby on Rails. I ne... (more)

An Introduction to Abbot

Graphical user interface (GUI) testing is a potentially problematic area because constructing effective test cases is more difficult than the corresponding application logic. The roadblocks to effective functional GUI testing are: Traditional test coverage criteria like "80% coverage of the lines of code" may not be sufficient to trap all the user interaction scenarios. End users often use a different user task interaction model than the one conceived by the development team. Functional GUI testing needs to deal with GUI events as well as the effects of the underlying application logic that results in changes to the data and presentation. The common methods for functional GUI testing are the "record and execute" script technique and writing test programs for different scenarios. In the "record and execute," the test designer interacts with the GUI and all the eve... (more)

How to Diagnose Java Resource Starvation

We can visualize resource starvation using an elaborate rendition of the Dining Philosophers Problem. This classic metaphor of resource allocation among processes was first introduced in 1971 by Edsger Dijkstra in his paper "Hierarchical Ordering of Sequential Processes." It's been a model and universal method for verifying theories on resource allocation ever since. The metaphor goes like this: There are three well-known philosophers in an Asian bistro. Dinner is served but they are only given three chopsticks because the restaurant's supply truck has been stuck in a snow storm for a couple of days. Naturally each philosopher needs two chopsticks to eat his dinner and each is protected from interference while he uses a chopstick. Plato skipped lunch that day and insists that he should have priority or else he'll faint. If he doesn't give up his chopsticks, the other ... (more)

Sun Was Too Arrogant To Survive

Sure, now that the deed is done and the board has approved the acquisition, there’s lots of Monday morning quarterbacks.  However, in this case, I’m not one of them.  Indeed, I point to the release of my 9/1997 report that I wrote for NC.Focus entitled “State of Java Report: IBM” and the subsequent press release where I assert that IBM is leading in deploying Java in the Enterprise. The story goes somewhat like this.  On the day I released the report, I subsequently released the press release through PR Newswire, but it was also available on the IBM website.  Within hours of posting the press release, IBM was contacted by Sun and told to remove the link to the press release on their website.  Ultimately, Sun did not like the fact that I presented that IBM was doing a better job of monetizing Java in the Enterprise than Sun was, but that was the truth. Now, Sun had ... (more)

A Framework for REST in Java

Not long ago I worked on a team charged with building up a Java-based REST infrastructure. Our goals were to first support what was then an emerging specification for Java-based RESTful services called JAX-RS. Beyond that, we had thoughts of building an entire framework, both server and client, around RESTful services written in Java. Some of the people I worked with on that team are now part of the team that is responsible for an open source implementation called Apache Wink which embodies some of our early ideas and much more. Developers have been implementing RESTful services in Java for a long, long time, so what's the deal with JAX-RS and an entire framework? Well, the way developers have been implementing REST services typically involves writing their own custom servlet. Within the servlet they write custom code to route incoming requests to the proper back-e... (more)

Reflections on Java Command Line Options

Abstract There are many different types of command line options that programs need to recognize. Many languages (e.g.: bash and perl) has built-in processing of command line options; Java does not. The Java Command Line Options (JCLO) package performs this task for a variety of option styles. It also uses Java's reflection capability to automatically assign values to variables in a specified class. Introduction Even in these days of sophisticated graphical user interfaces, many programs have a wide variety of command line options that help specify their behavior. It is also the case that command line only programs continue to enjoy wide use. It is also the case the command line arguments can become quite complicated, e.g.: -Djava.util.logging.config.file=All.finest -1 --list --this=that Some languages have built-in parsers for command line options; perl and bash ar... (more)

Revisiting Java SE 7 Features | @CloudExpo #Java #Cloud #OpenSource

Preparing for an interview? Want to just revisit Java SE 7 features? Trying to recollect or revise a Java SE programming construct? Let me take you back in time to what was introduced first in Java SE 7? Join me for this tutorial series on Java as we all eagerly await the official release of Java SE 9. Java SE 7 Release Date: 28-07-2011 Java SE 7 Code Name: Dolphin Java SE 7 Highlights Strings in switch statements. Automatic resource management in try statements. Improved type inference for generic instance creation, AKA the diamond operator <>. Simplified varargs method declaration. Binary integer literals. Allowing underscores in numeric literals. Catching multiple exception types and rethrowing exceptions with improved type checking. I have provided some of the most important core language enhancements for JDK 7.0, along with code samples. The examples provided bel... (more)

Java for Managers -- What Should They Know?

Last month, JavaBlackBelt completed a survey where developers said their teams would be 25% more productive if their management committed to skills management... which led me to consider: Which Java technologies do developers think that managers should understand better in order to make great decisions about skills management? I'll suggest, as a start: -- Java SE and EE basics -- ORM's (Hibernate, ...) -- Web Frameworks (lStruts 2, ...) -- IDEs (Eclipse, ...) -- Source Code Mgmt -- Testing Methods -- JavaScript -- Ajax Very open to your thoughts, and who might find such a course useful... feel free to comment here and/or send email to java4managers@globalforcedirect.com. ... (more)

So...Exactly How Can We Increase Java Productivity by 25%?

Last month, JavaBlackBelt members reported that their productivity would increase by 25% if management installed Java Skills Management.  The pressing question from managers: how do we do this? I've talked with JBB founder John Rizzo and he's developed a 6-step "installation plan" for Java skills management.  Those steps and highlights are below my salutation. If you’d like to discuss/start this process, feel free to say so at: globalforcedirect.com/discovery-sessions/. Step 1. Discovery No-charge JBB consultations on installing Java skills management into the organization.  JBB explains possibilities, explore priorities, establishes extent/timeline.  Managers describe organizational make-up, skills champions, existing training methods, employee review/reporting needs.  Developers describe missions, key technologies. Step 2. Startup Installation of JavaBlackBelt Enterpr... (more)

Open Survey on New eLearning Method For Java Technologies

JavaBlackBelt is considering offering “coach-assisted eLearning” courses on Java technologies such as Spring/Hibernate/more.  It’s a new type of learning and they are interested in your feedback. Please consider taking a 5 minute survey and you will receive 10 contribution points towards JavaBlackBelt certification exams.  Goto here. Thanks for your time and we look forward to sharing results with you. ... (more)

Interviewing Java Developers With Tears in My Eyes

During the last week I had to interview five developers for a position that required the following skills: Flex, Java, Spring, and Hibernate.  Most of these guys had demonstrated the 3 out of 10 level of Flex skills even though each of them claimed a practical experience on at least two projects. But this didn’t surprise me – Flex is still pretty new and there is only a small number of developers on the market who can really get Flex things done. What surprised me the most is a low level of Java skills of most of these people. They have 5-8 years of Java EE projects behind their belts, but they were not Java developers. They were species that I can call Robot-Configurator.  Each of them knew how to configure XML files for Spring, they knew how to hook up Spring and Hibernate and how to map a Java class to a database entity. Some of them even knew how to configure laz... (more)